Bunaken National Park

Bunaken Island offers a plethora of wall experiences for visiting divers. Everyone has their favorite site and mine is Lekuan 2. Judging from the number of divers who frequent the site, many agree with me. The reasons are obvious immediately upon entry. You can’t help but notice the high concentration of schooling fish from the drummers and fusliliers that greet you as you begin your descent, the blizzards of brightly-colored anthias you pass along the edge of the reeftop, continuing to fall through the clouds of pyramid butterflyfish and bannerfish underneath. The variety of reef fish is astounding: you could pick out over 20 species of butterflyfish alone if you so desired.

The start of the traditional dive offers small treasures as candy crabs frequent the beautiful soft corals in the area, often adorning themselves with a sprig of live soft coral they’ve affixed atop their head. The faerie crab, a fingernail-sized squat lobster that’s pink and hairy can be found by a discerning eye peering among the outer folds of barrel sponges. But don’t become engrossed with the macro life so much that you miss any of the larger residents: sharks that pass you by below your fins, napoleons wrasse or bumphead parrotfish above you, or turtles out in the blue off the wall.

Toward the end of the site, the Lekuan point, the current predictably picks up just as you notice the schools of redtooth triggerfish around you. Sharks enjoy the current as well, often coming up to only five meters in depth to cut over the point to Lekuan 1. Resident napoleons, giant trevally, jacks, batfish and solitary giant barracuda are predictably seen along this stretch, but smaller denizens such as leaf scorpionfish are common as well, keeping your attention divided between the lush wall and the blue ocean.

With the wall going from only 2-5 meters along the top to 50-70 meters along the bottom, where a narrow shelf exists before the wall continues to plunge into the abyss, you can alter your depth to find an entire new set of attractions dive after dive. Boredom is definitely not an option.

Source: “What’s happening?” Mag

Bunaken National Park

PHOTO GALLERY

Batfish school.jpg Ben Frans James Mike 2.jpg Bumblebee Shrimp.jpg Bunaken Underwater.jpg Bunaken-National-Marine-Park-in-Manado.jpg DSC_0323_nrt.jpg DSC_0336.JPG DSC_0362.JPG DSC_0376.JPG Diving Bunaken (1).jpg Lionfish-009.jpg Pink-Eye Goby.jpg Rhinopias.jpg sunset in Bunaken.jpg bunaken reef.jpg dive with turtle.jpg


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